Top Names

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Andrew English has been the motoring correspondent for The Daily Telegraph for 25 years. He owns a series of unreliable old cars and motorcycles and a Labrador and lives with his family in Cornwall.

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Award-winning journalist with more than 25 years’ experience. Loves a data-driven story.

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Hey guys, I'm a petrolhead who lives on the outskirts of London, I produce video car content for my YouTube channel and YesAuto. I hope you enjoy my stuff. Cheers, Joe @joeachilles on Insta

Chris has been writing about cars for 20 years, and in that time he's been lucky enough to drive everything from an original 18bhp Fiat 500 to the latest 1479bhp Bugatti Chiron

An automotive journalist for 24 years, and former editor of Auto Express and Carbuyer.

An auto and moto expert for over twelve years and also the founder of Flat-Out Magazine

I've been writing about all things automotive for well over a decade now. I particularly love a good van or pickup truck story

Jamie_FYD

My name's Jamie and i drive cars and talk to myself, alot.

Spotting the most amazing supercars and luxury cars on the streets!

London-based record-breaking, award-winning car writer has written and made videos about all things automotive for more than 20 years both here, in Australia and the US

Motoring and lifestyle journalist, prolific road tripper and all-round automobilist. From classics to concept cars - usually found in the pages of magazines, online or at @RoryFHSmith.

Lewis Kingston is an award-winning motoring journalist with a degree in motorsports engineering

Trending Content

What breakdown cover do you get with a new car?

You may not expect a new car to break down, but just in case you do almost every car manufacturer includes some form of complimentary recovery service in the price of a new car. To find out which brand offers what level of cover, we’ve investigated the top 20 car brands in the UK to see which offers the best level of cover. Volkswagen Most new VWs include one year free AA cover but if you buy an ID model or a Toureg, then you’ll get three years. Not only does this cover include roadside assistance and recovery if the fault can’t be fixed, but also home cover. In the event of an accident VW will also recover the car to a VW garage. The brand will also help with onward travel if necessary including options such as a replacement vehicle or taxi. VW also claims it will recover trailers and caravans if you’re towing at the time of breakdown. Ford Included in Ford Assistance is one year of basic breakdown service which will help if you need assistance while away from home. If the car can’t be fixed at the roadside, it will be recovered and if necessary a temporary loan car may be offered for up to two days. What’s more this is extended for free for a year if the car is serviced at a Ford dealership. Audi Like sister firm Volkswagen, Audi owners can expect roadside assistance and recover, plus home start. And in the event of an accident, the car will be recovered to an Audi dealership. The company also offers onward travel via car hire for a maximum of two days if you breakd

What breakdown cover do you get with a new car?

Niu UQi GT review: a stylish high-tech electric city slicker

If there ever was a vehicle to receive the full electrification treatment it would be the humble scooter. No, not the kind you see kids back-flipping on ramps at your local skatepark, but the entry-level Lexmoto Echos, Piaggio Zips and AJS Modenas of this world. With most boasting a top speed of around 30mph and extremely restricted horsepower outputs, they are the perfect platform for stuffing with small battery packs and hub-based electric motors for a less polluting and more silent alternative to the pukka pukka of the teenager’s freedom machine. What’s more, the devilish concoction of a global pandemic and a recent fuel shortage means more folk are looking for ways to buzz around town without having to share a carriage with potentially deadly human beings or the need to queue with raging folk at a ransacked fuel station.  Chinese electric scooter company Niu has known electric is the way to go for a long time and has been busy trying to tear buyers away from petrol options for some years now. Its current range features the futuristically sporty NQi model, as well as a larger capacity rival in the form of the MQi GT.  This bike, the skinny-framed UQi GT, is a pitched as an urban warrior, with neo-Honda Cub styling and thoroughly modern onboard tech, it makes a strong case for itself as an alternative to riding public transport or getting sweaty on a bicycle. You can ride one at 16 years old, so long as you have a CBT, and it will travel around 35-40 miles

Niu UQi GT review: a stylish high-tech electric city slicker

Six premium car brands that struggled to make an impact

The arrival of Genesis on the UK market as a fully-fledged luxury car brand in its own right is one of the more interesting developments in recent times. The cars we’ve seen so far look good, and with Hyundai’s millions behind the project, it has a fighting chance of success – but it will be fascinating to see if buyers respond positively.   Because launching an upscale brand can be a real challenge in the badge-obsessed car market, where there are so many desirable established names. The product, marketing, timing and positioning all have to be perfectly executed, or failure beckons. History is sprinkled with examples of new premium propositions that failed to take off – here we take a look at six brands that found the going tougher than expected.   Merkur   Take a quick glance at the picture below. It’s a Ford Sierra, right? Nope, it’s not. And that probably tells you all you need to know about the blue oval’s ill-fated foray into the upper echelons of the American market between 1985 and 1989. This car was actually marketed as the Merkur XR4Ti, as Ford created a new brand to try to capitalise on the States’ growing appetite for sporty premium European cars. But the idea never really took off, for reasons that now seem rather obvious in hindsight. Firstly, the base car – the Sierra – simply wasn’t a premium product, even in this guise. Plus selling the vehicle at existing dealers diminished any idea of uniqueness. The name, too, was confusing – Merku

Six premium car brands that struggled to make an impact

Electric cars: a 10-point guide to your first long journey

Interest in electric cars has soared thanks to the increasing number of EVs available, greater ranges and more recently the petrol and diesel crisis. As that interest converts to sales, more and more people will be driving fully electric cars for the first time. And for those looking to go further afield YesAuto has created a 10-point guide to avoid range anxiety and make that trip go as smoothly as it would in a petrol or diesel car. 1. Planning The secret to covering long journeys in EVs is lots of planning. Unfortunately there’s no shortcut in this respect. Once drivers know they’re going on a trip that will necessitate on-route charging then they’ll need to factor in a few things to work out the best place to charge. Knowing the range of the car is obviously essential, plus the journey length, but it’s also worth considering how far from your desired route you’re willing to deviate to charge and how much you’re willing to pay for electricity. The best way to plan is to use either Zapmap or the app from the car maker – which almost all EVs have. However, it may be worth also using Google Maps as some of its mapping tools – such as traffic conditions – aren’t covered by Zapmap. 2. Different types of charge point Make sure you know how fast your car will charge. If the car will only charge at 50kW there’s little point looking at 100kW+ charge points which can be more expensive. However, the opposite is also true. If the car will charge at 100kW or higher, then usi

Electric cars: a 10-point guide to your first long journey

Funding for 9.5 million pothole repairs ‘lost from council budgets’

Annual funding for more than 9.5 million pothole repairs has been lost from council budgets, according to new analysis. The Local Government Association (LGA) said overall capital funding from the Department for Transport to councils in England for local road maintenance in 2021/22 is £1.39 billion, down from £1.78 billion the previous year. That £399 million reduction could have paid for tens of thousands of potholes to be fixed in every local council area, with repairs costing an average of nearly £42, the LGA calculated. The LGA urged the Treasury to use the upcoming spending review to plug the “£400 million gap” and commit to giving councils an additional £500 million per year for road repairs. The organisation’s transport spokesman, David Renard, said: “Councils are working hard to keep our roads safe and resilient, repairing potholes as quickly as they can. “However, it would already take £10 billion and more than a decade to clear the current local roads repair backlog, with the Covid-19 pandemic and subsequent cancellation of key planned works risking extending this backlog further. “With long-term and consistent investment in local road maintenance in the spending review, councils can embark on the widespread improvement of our roads that is desperately needed, to the benefit of all road users up and down the country, including cyclists.” (PA Graphics) Jack Cousens, head of roads policy for the AA, said; “Arguably the local road network is the larges

Funding for 9.5 million pothole repairs ‘lost from council budgets’

10 Japanese kei cars we'd love to own

As the old adage goes, size matters. With European cars getting bigger and more bloated – partly to accommodate the Western world’s ever more obese population – there is something to be said about the simplicity of a small car. And nobody does downsized motors better than the Japanese, who know all too well the benefits they can afford in hugely congested urban centres. To that end, a class of vehicle called kei cars was introduced in 1949 – microcars which had restrictions placed on engine size, power output and dimensions. The regulations have been revised a number of times over the years, but currently stand at 3,400mm (length), 1480mm (width), 660cc and 63bhp. Safety concerns have generally prevented these cars from going on sale in the UK – with a few exceptions – which is a shame, as the need to package everything in such a tiny footprint has led to some ingenious and desirable creations. Here, then, are 10 of our favourite kei cars, which conclusively prove the best things really do come in small packages. Honda Beat   The recipe for the Beat was straightforward– a mid-engined two-seat roadster with a free-revving naturally aspirated engine, all wrapped up in a simple but stylish package. It was sold from 1991 to 1996, and alongside the Suzuki Cappuccino and Autozam AZ-1 (see below) it added an element of sporty desirability to the kei car class. Although the three-cylinder engine was pegged at 63bhp, the car’s ability to rev to 8,500rpm and its minimal 760kg wei

10 Japanese kei cars we'd love to own

Why are used car prices going up? And how to find a bargain

In order to work out why used car prices are going up, not down, we need to take a step back and look at the new car market because all used cars start off as new cars. Simply put, due to the global pandemic, factories around the world have not been running as normal. A combination of staff shortages, lockdowns and parts shortages (mostly microchips) mean that cars have been built in significantly smaller volumes than normal. As the primary method for used cars entering the market being when a new car is bought – via a part exchange – with fewer new cars sold, fewer used cars enter the market. From new to used This ripples through from those buying new to those buying a two or three-year old car on to those buying a four or five-year old car and so on. Used car price expert, Mark Bulmer, senior valuations editor at Cap HPI, explained: “What we've seen is a really prolonged strengthening in the market, and the balance between supply and demand is obviously in favour of the seller. That is what's been pushing prices up. And the prices are as high as they are really because there are fewer part exchanges coming into the market from new cars, because as we know, the semiconductor issues that we've had this year remain with us, and we expect to be with us for some time to come.” According to Bulmer, a good barometer for the situation is the number of trade sales –cars being bought by dealers to stock forecourts – which are running down 25% over normal levels. “It's just

Why are used car prices going up? And how to find a bargain

Which electric cars hold their value the best?

Assuming you’ve got over your range anxiety and want to buy a fully electric car, your next biggest concern is most likely to be the cost of buying one. Despite government grants designed to make EVs more attractive to buyers by offering a few thousand pounds off the list price, electric cars are still typically more expensive than their petrol or diesel equivalent. However, in reality it’s not the list price of an EV (or any car) that buyers need to worry about, it’s the depreciation cost. In other words, the difference between the price you pay when it’s new and the price you can sell it for when you sell. This depreciation in value is the start point for any finance for the car – in other words, it’s the factor that needs funding which is not the cost when the car is new. With around 90% of private new car buyers opting for a finance scheme, you can see why depreciation is a big issue. In other words, you could find the scenario where a car with a higher list price costs less to finance per month than a less expensive car all because the more expensive car loses less value than the car with the lower list price. YesAuto spoke to car valuation expert Dylan Setterfield, head of forecast strategy at Cap HPI, to find out which EV in each of five sectors of the market offered the lowest depreciation – in other words likely to give you the best deal. The figures used by Setterfield show the predicted depreciation after three years and 30,000 miles. Supermini 1. Mini Ele

Which electric cars hold their value the best?

These are the used car finance capitals of the UK

Crawley is the used car capital of the UK, with more vehicles financed in the town this year than anywhere else. The West Sussex town was followed by Croydon in South London and Dunfermline in Scotland, according to analysis by Volkswagen Financial Services UK (VWFS). The top five was completed by Slough in Berkshire and Aberdeen in Scotland. The three cities that have seen the biggest annual growth in the number of used cars being sold are Coventry and Southampton in England and Glasgow in Scotland. Meanwhile, the increased interest in electric vehicles is being seen in the used car market, with VWFS seeing the number of used EVs financed increase 76 per cent from 2020 to 2021, while petrol and diesel cars have fallen 23 per cent and 37 per cent respectively. Mike Todd, CEO at Volkswagen Financial Services UK, said: “The used car market in the UK has never been as buoyant as it is right now with supply shortages continuing to affect the new car market and it’s encouraging to see that so many young people are interested in driving used models. “Used cars are typically much cheaper to buy than new cars, and there are usually shorter wait times once you’ve chosen the vehicle you want, so there are plenty of advantages to going down the used route. (Blackball Media) “I think lots of people are still apprehensive about travelling on public transport, so coupled with the supply issues, we’re seeing increased demand among people looking for cheaper personal mobility

These are the used car finance capitals of the UK