Top Names

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Andrew English has been the motoring correspondent for The Daily Telegraph for 25 years. He owns a series of unreliable old cars and motorcycles and a Labrador and lives with his family in Cornwall.

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Award-winning journalist with more than 25 years’ experience. Loves a data-driven story.

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Hey guys, I'm a petrolhead who lives on the outskirts of London, I produce video car content for my YouTube channel and YesAuto. I hope you enjoy my stuff. Cheers, Joe @joeachilles on Insta

Chris has been writing about cars for 20 years, and in that time he's been lucky enough to drive everything from an original 18bhp Fiat 500 to the latest 1479bhp Bugatti Chiron

An automotive journalist for 24 years, and former editor of Auto Express and Carbuyer.

An auto and moto expert for over twelve years and also the founder of Flat-Out Magazine

I've been writing about all things automotive for well over a decade now. I particularly love a good van or pickup truck story

Jamie_FYD

My name's Jamie and i drive cars and talk to myself, alot.

Spotting the most amazing supercars and luxury cars on the streets!

London-based record-breaking, award-winning car writer has written and made videos about all things automotive for more than 20 years both here, in Australia and the US

Motoring and lifestyle journalist, prolific road tripper and all-round automobilist. From classics to concept cars - usually found in the pages of magazines, online or at @RoryFHSmith.

Lewis Kingston is an award-winning motoring journalist with a degree in motorsports engineering

Trending Content

New 2022 Renault Megane E-Tech Electric: Andrew English drives

Renault’s all-new battery strategy starts next autumn when the Mégane E-Tech Electric, a new family SUV/Crossover, goes on sale in the UK. It’s a safe choice, but at the same time, also a brave one. Let me explain… Safe? Because family SUVs are Europe’s biggest car sector, comprising over 22 per cent of every new car sold. So, there’s a market there at least… Safe, because this is a lithium-ion powered battery-electric car with the batteries mounted in the floor within the wheelbase, a configuration chosen by just about every other rival including Volvo’s XC40 Recharge, Mercedes-Benz EQA, Tesla’s Model 3 and Kia’s e-Niro.  Safe, because this conservative choice of front-drive battery configuration is going to slot under the floor of what Gilles Le Borgne Renault Group’s veteran engineering head says will be around three million vehicles including Nissan’s Ariya, Dacia’s Bigster as well as a smaller set of vehicles based around Renault’s R5 concept and a replacement for the Nissan Micra Safe, because as Luca de Meo, Renault’s chief executive says: “This is not disruptive technology, it is incremental, so costs and performance will improve by seven or eight per cent a year, which means it will take a decade to get twice the range and halve the cost.”  Brave?  But it’s also brave, because it’s a bet on a highly uncertain future. If a rival battery chemistry such as the cheaper but less energy-dense lithium-iron phosphate batteries, or the

New 2022 Renault Megane E-Tech Electric: Andrew English drives

What breakdown cover do you get with a new car?

You may not expect a new car to break down, but just in case you do almost every car manufacturer includes some form of complimentary recovery service in the price of a new car. To find out which brand offers what level of cover, we’ve investigated the top 20 car brands in the UK to see which offers the best level of cover. Volkswagen Most new VWs include one year free AA cover but if you buy an ID model or a Toureg, then you’ll get three years. Not only does this cover include roadside assistance and recovery if the fault can’t be fixed, but also home cover. In the event of an accident VW will also recover the car to a VW garage. The brand will also help with onward travel if necessary including options such as a replacement vehicle or taxi. VW also claims it will recover trailers and caravans if you’re towing at the time of breakdown. Ford Included in Ford Assistance is one year of basic breakdown service which will help if you need assistance while away from home. If the car can’t be fixed at the roadside, it will be recovered and if necessary a temporary loan car may be offered for up to two days. What’s more this is extended for free for a year if the car is serviced at a Ford dealership. Audi Like sister firm Volkswagen, Audi owners can expect roadside assistance and recover, plus home start. And in the event of an accident, the car will be recovered to an Audi dealership. The company also offers onward travel via car hire for a maximum of two days if you breakd

What breakdown cover do you get with a new car?

Niu UQi GT review: a stylish high-tech electric city slicker

If there ever was a vehicle to receive the full electrification treatment it would be the humble scooter. No, not the kind you see kids back-flipping on ramps at your local skatepark, but the entry-level Lexmoto Echos, Piaggio Zips and AJS Modenas of this world. With most boasting a top speed of around 30mph and extremely restricted horsepower outputs, they are the perfect platform for stuffing with small battery packs and hub-based electric motors for a less polluting and more silent alternative to the pukka pukka of the teenager’s freedom machine. What’s more, the devilish concoction of a global pandemic and a recent fuel shortage means more folk are looking for ways to buzz around town without having to share a carriage with potentially deadly human beings or the need to queue with raging folk at a ransacked fuel station.  Chinese electric scooter company Niu has known electric is the way to go for a long time and has been busy trying to tear buyers away from petrol options for some years now. Its current range features the futuristically sporty NQi model, as well as a larger capacity rival in the form of the MQi GT.  This bike, the skinny-framed UQi GT, is a pitched as an urban warrior, with neo-Honda Cub styling and thoroughly modern onboard tech, it makes a strong case for itself as an alternative to riding public transport or getting sweaty on a bicycle. You can ride one at 16 years old, so long as you have a CBT, and it will travel around 35-40 miles

Niu UQi GT review: a stylish high-tech electric city slicker

Alfa Romeo sets out 10-year plan to save the brand

Alfa Romeo has made promises about its future before and sales have been up and sales have been down. Now under the stewardship of mega-group Stellantis which also owns brands as varied as Maserati, Peugeot, Chrysler, Jeep and Vauxhall, Alfa Romeo has put a 10-year plan in place to ensure the survival of the classic Italian badge. In charge of Alfa Romeo since the start of the year, CEO Jean-Philippe Imparato has now set in stone his plans to save the brand including five new models in the next five years. The 10-year plan splits into two halves. “The five year plan is coming, it is completely locked, validated and funded,” said Imparato. “We will launch one car per year in the coming five years because this brand needs to refuel, to feed the business.” New cars Alfa Romeo currently sells two models; the Giulia saloon and the Stelvio SUV. It has already revealed it will start selling a smaller SUV called Tonale next year – likely to arrive in late spring. Imparato believes a wider range of cars will appeal to a wider audience particularly a “younger, more female, more family oriented” community. The Tonale will be Alfa Romeo’s first to be offered with a plug-in hybrid option. Alfa’s first fully electric car will come in 2024 with a second in 2025. And by 2027, according to Imparato, all models will be “100% electric”. 10-year plan After the first five years, he said he will then finalise the second five year plan. This second plan will depending on the first’s

Alfa Romeo sets out 10-year plan to save the brand

Six premium car brands that struggled to make an impact

The arrival of Genesis on the UK market as a fully-fledged luxury car brand in its own right is one of the more interesting developments in recent times. The cars we’ve seen so far look good, and with Hyundai’s millions behind the project, it has a fighting chance of success – but it will be fascinating to see if buyers respond positively.   Because launching an upscale brand can be a real challenge in the badge-obsessed car market, where there are so many desirable established names. The product, marketing, timing and positioning all have to be perfectly executed, or failure beckons. History is sprinkled with examples of new premium propositions that failed to take off – here we take a look at six brands that found the going tougher than expected.   Merkur   Take a quick glance at the picture below. It’s a Ford Sierra, right? Nope, it’s not. And that probably tells you all you need to know about the blue oval’s ill-fated foray into the upper echelons of the American market between 1985 and 1989. This car was actually marketed as the Merkur XR4Ti, as Ford created a new brand to try to capitalise on the States’ growing appetite for sporty premium European cars. But the idea never really took off, for reasons that now seem rather obvious in hindsight. Firstly, the base car – the Sierra – simply wasn’t a premium product, even in this guise. Plus selling the vehicle at existing dealers diminished any idea of uniqueness. The name, too, was confusing – Merku

Six premium car brands that struggled to make an impact

Engine names: what do they mean?

For decades car makers have included an engine designation in the title of their cars in part to inform but also to promote. These engine tags have been around so long that these days we take them for granted and worry little about what they actually mean or stand for. So to rectify that situation, YesAuto has picked some of the newest, best-selling and longest standing engine names and found out what each stands for. Before we get started, there are few basics that tend to apply across the board. For instance, in engine naming terms the letter ‘i’, upper or lower case, almost always stands for ‘injection’. Historically, ‘i’ signified electronic fuel injection rather than the use of a mechanical carburettor. However, now every modern car with a combustion engine uses fuel injection rather than a carburettor, which may make it seem like the ‘i' is a little superfluous to requirements. And ‘D’ usually, but not always, stands for diesel. However, it’s designations such as this where confusion can begin to build; that’s because ‘D’ can also stand for ‘direct’. TDI Possibly one of the most well-known engine names is TDI, first used by VW Group. And while all TDI engines are diesels, the ‘D’ in TDI actually refers to direct, as in direct injection. The ‘T’ in this case – and almost all other automotive engine uses – stand for turbocharged. Interestingly, Volkswagen’s own website doesn’t actually call TDI an acronym and give each letter a word, instead pointing out that i

Engine names: what do they mean?

Electric cars: a 10-point guide to your first long journey

Interest in electric cars has soared thanks to the increasing number of EVs available, greater ranges and more recently the petrol and diesel crisis. As that interest converts to sales, more and more people will be driving fully electric cars for the first time. And for those looking to go further afield YesAuto has created a 10-point guide to avoid range anxiety and make that trip go as smoothly as it would in a petrol or diesel car. 1. Planning The secret to covering long journeys in EVs is lots of planning. Unfortunately there’s no shortcut in this respect. Once drivers know they’re going on a trip that will necessitate on-route charging then they’ll need to factor in a few things to work out the best place to charge. Knowing the range of the car is obviously essential, plus the journey length, but it’s also worth considering how far from your desired route you’re willing to deviate to charge and how much you’re willing to pay for electricity. The best way to plan is to use either Zapmap or the app from the car maker – which almost all EVs have. However, it may be worth also using Google Maps as some of its mapping tools – such as traffic conditions – aren’t covered by Zapmap. 2. Different types of charge point Make sure you know how fast your car will charge. If the car will only charge at 50kW there’s little point looking at 100kW+ charge points which can be more expensive. However, the opposite is also true. If the car will charge at 100kW or higher, then usi

Electric cars: a 10-point guide to your first long journey

17 people died in crashes involving drivers distracted by phones in 2020

Seventeen people were killed on Britain’s roads last year in crashes involving drivers distracted by mobile phones, new analysis shows as the Government unveils tougher rules for using the devices. A further 114 people were seriously injured and 385 were slightly injured in such collisions, Department for Transport figures show. More than one in six of those killed or seriously injured were either a pedestrian or a cyclist, highlighting the threat posed to vulnerable road users from drivers preoccupied by phones. Under current UK laws, drivers are banned from texting or making a phone call – other than in an emergency – while using a handheld device. Speaking on the phone while driving is against the law (Anna Gowthorpe/PA) From 2022, drivers will not be allowed to take photos or videos, scroll through playlists or play games on their phones when driving. Anyone caught using their hand-held device while driving will face a £200 fixed penalty notice and six points on their licence. Drivers can still use devices such as sat navs and mobile phones using satellite navigation, if they are secured in a cradle. But motorists must take responsibility for their driving and can be prosecuted if the police find them not in proper control of their vehicle. Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said: “By making it easier to prosecute people illegally using their phone at the wheel, we are ensuring the law is brought into the 21st century while further protecting all road users. “W

17 people died in crashes involving drivers distracted by phones in 2020

The greatest cars in 50 years of BMW's M division

2022 marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of one of the true icons of performance cars, BMW’s Motorsport division. As the name suggests, the department was initially formed to give extra impetus to the Bavarian company’s efforts in the sporting arena, but it evolved to deliver some of the finest road cars of the past five decades – all marked out by that magical ‘M’ badge. To mark the anniversary, let’s take a look at the machines that earned the M division its hallowed reputation.   3.0 CSL ‘Batmobile’ (E9)   We know what you’re thinking… where’s the M? And the simple answer is it’s nowhere to be seen, because although the CSL was developed by the motorsport division for competition, the M designation had not yet been determined at that stage. The CSL was a lightweight version of the standard CS built from 1971-1975 that was fitted with a straight six-cylinder engine that ultimately delivered 203bhp and became known as the Batmobile on account of its wild looks, in particular the fins along the side and huge rear wing. The racing version enjoyed great success in touring cars; the road car was much coveted. M1 (E26)   The most lusted after BMW ever? Quite possibly. While the fiberglass bodied mid-engined supercar was only in production between 1978 and 1981, and relatively few were made – a total of 399 plus around 50 race cars – its iconic status has grown over the years, with Giorgetto Giugiaro’s dramatic design a perfect snapshot of the wedge look

The greatest cars in 50 years of BMW's M division

Funding for 9.5 million pothole repairs ‘lost from council budgets’

Annual funding for more than 9.5 million pothole repairs has been lost from council budgets, according to new analysis. The Local Government Association (LGA) said overall capital funding from the Department for Transport to councils in England for local road maintenance in 2021/22 is £1.39 billion, down from £1.78 billion the previous year. That £399 million reduction could have paid for tens of thousands of potholes to be fixed in every local council area, with repairs costing an average of nearly £42, the LGA calculated. The LGA urged the Treasury to use the upcoming spending review to plug the “£400 million gap” and commit to giving councils an additional £500 million per year for road repairs. The organisation’s transport spokesman, David Renard, said: “Councils are working hard to keep our roads safe and resilient, repairing potholes as quickly as they can. “However, it would already take £10 billion and more than a decade to clear the current local roads repair backlog, with the Covid-19 pandemic and subsequent cancellation of key planned works risking extending this backlog further. “With long-term and consistent investment in local road maintenance in the spending review, councils can embark on the widespread improvement of our roads that is desperately needed, to the benefit of all road users up and down the country, including cyclists.” (PA Graphics) Jack Cousens, head of roads policy for the AA, said; “Arguably the local road network is the larges

Funding for 9.5 million pothole repairs ‘lost from council budgets’